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TikTok video goes viral as KFC replaces lettuce with cabbage in burgers

Customers have taken to social media to declare they’re “not happy Jan” after KFC made a controversial change to their burgers.

Customers have taken to social media to declare they’re “not happy Jan” after KFC made a controversial change to their burgers.

The iconic fast food chain informed diners earlier this month that their menu items would feature a “temporary blend” of cabbage and lettuce because of Australia’s current shortage of the leafy salad green.

“We’ve hit a bit of an Iceberg and are currently experiencing some lettuce supply chain disruptions,” they said in an update on their website.

“This means you may see a temporary blend of lettuce and cabbage throughout KFC restaurants except those in NT & SA … We’re working with our multiple suppliers to provide them with support, but we do expect disruptions to continue in the coming days.

“Apologies for any inconvenience caused, we appreciate you all being Little Gems as we work to get things back to normal ASAP.”

Regulars at the establishment haven’t been completely understanding, though, with one going viral in a TikTok showing their half-eaten burger.

The user – whose clip has drummed up 15,000 likes and more than 500 comments – overlaid a video of Deborah Kennedy’s iconic Yellow Pages ad, yelling, “Not happy Jan.”

Dozens of people in the comments echoed the sentiment, writing that “no one likes cabbage”.

“Cabbage is bitter,” one complained, while another wondered, “First the tomato now the lettuce?! What’s next, cheese?”

One user who identified themself “as a KFC employee” apologized for the cabbage and lettuce mix, writing “it’s because of the floods, we’re sorry :(”.

Not everyone agreed, though, that the change of salad on the burgers was that bad.

“Literally tastes the exact same,” one commented, with another agreeing, “It tastes the same I’m not complaining”.

Some even went as far as to claim KFC tasted better have a result.

“I rate it, gives a nice crunch instead of the soggy yellow paste of the lettuce they’ve used for the past few years,” commented one person.

“Makes it taste better, what ya whinging about,” wrote a second.

While a third also added they “actually prefer it with cabbage it’s nice and crunchy”.

Subway, Red Rooster and Oporto have also made the switch, with the latter two telling news.com.au last week that due to the nationwide lettuce shortage, they were “temporarily using a blend of lettuce and cabbage in some menu items”.

For now, McDonald’s Australia has said it remains unaffected by the disaster, saying in a statement they were “working closely with our suppliers to continue to serve up our full menu to customers”.

The price of lettuce has skyrocketed in recent months – to $12 for just one head of iceberg in some parts of the country – with Victorian lettuce grower and chair of the industry body for the Australian vegetable producers, AUSVEG, Bill Bulmer, telling 3AW that the price hikes won’t stop any time soon.

Mr Bulmer explained that the devastating floods in Queensland were the main reason behind the shortages, wiping out about 80 per cent of lettuce crops.

“We have been pounded by La Nina in the last 12 months,” he told the radio station.

“The major growing region of Australia for lettuce this time of year is out of Brisbane in the Gatton region and they have been impacted by floods in February as well as in May.

“In normal times you would probably see lettuce from $1.50 to $2.50 in the supermarket right now,” Mr Bulmer added.

The AUSVEG chair said he wouldn’t even bother buying a lettuce in the supermarket at the moment because of how much prices have risen.

“I have heard prices anywhere from $10 to $12. That is a supply and demand issue,” he said.

“There are pockets of lettuces here and there across Australia but, as I said, the bulk comes out of the Gatton region this time of the year.

“People who want them are paying for them.”

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